Why It’s Important to Lock Your Computer and Phone

adobeLocked steel padlock in a drilled hole of the black laptop on dark background. Concept of protecting personal data on a computer. A laptop is locked with a lock. Closeup, selective focusstock

Network security is not always about implementing new encryption protocols and using state-of-the-art tools to protect your business. Sometimes, it’s the small things that can make a massive difference. So, if your collective staff can implement this one easy trick, you might be surprised by how beneficial it can be for your network’s security. This practice? Locking your computer and phone.

What Is Locking Your Phone and Computer?

Essentially, your phone and computer can go into a sort of sleep mode when they’re not being used. You do this every time you close the screen on your phone. When your phone “wakes up” to be used, there should be a password required to get back into your phone. Otherwise, anyone can swipe the screen and start reading.

Locking your phone is second nature, and many people have complex passkeys or fingerprints required to do so. Computers are a different matter. Most office workers will stand up and leave their desks without locking their PC. The better practice is to lock your PC, either by performing the lock sequence that will prompt the next user for a password or putting it into a sleep mode that requires a password upon your return.

Let’s take a quick look at the benefits you get from locking your phone and computer.

Keeping Private Documents Out of Sight

The chances that corporate espionage is going to take place at a medium-sized landscaping company might be small compared to a large media conglomerate. Nevertheless, private documents on phones and computers often hide passwords and personal information.

Allowing those resources to be compromised can harm your reputation and leave you open to a litany of problems, including lawsuits.

Your Work Phone and Computer Are Vectors for Malware

Hundreds of people can come and go from a large workplace daily, and it’s not like you can keep track of them all. Unfortunately, it only takes one person with bad intent to find a computer or work phone that is connected to your company’s network and upload malware.

The most common vector for malware these days is email, and many of your company’s resources are geared towards stopping that threat as long as it’s from an external source. However, if someone sends an internal email from a trusted worker’s account and CCs everyone in the building, then it’s safe to say most people would let down their guard enough to open that email.

All it takes is a single terminal to remain unlocked and someone can wreak havoc on your business. Locking your computer and work phones can deter this threat or make at least delay the intruder long enough for them to be caught.

The benefits of locking your phone and computer at work go beyond malware and corporate espionage, though. It stops workers from learning about promotions, pay rates, and internal investigations. Locking your computer can also prevent data from being altered on a project without your knowledge.

Implementing this change is simple, and it does not require a lot of time. Get your team together, teach them how to lock their computers and phones, and test them once in a while to make sure they’re compliant. Not only will this increase security, but it will make your workers feel more like true stakeholders in the well-being of your business.

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5 Technology Challenges Businesses can Expect in 2020

watch out for cyber attacks this holiday season

As new solutions and inventions continue to aid businesses, they come with a ton of technology challenges. Where a connected world allows you to take your business digital, it comes with the risk of cyber-attacks. Where you can get clients from any corner of the world, there is the challenge of data privacy.

But it is not all doom and gloom. Yes, there are challenges, but forewarned is forearmed. Here are some of the problems you can expect to face in 2020 and how you can prepare.

Cyber Security

More and more customers are coming forward about hackers breaking into their ring devices, and wreaking havoc in their homes. Such attacks are a foreboding that most businesses will struggle with cyber-security in 2020.

Some threats include phishing and social-engineering attacks. Of every 99 emails, one is a phishing attack amounting to 4.8-emails in a workweek. Phishing attacks are the gravest as they can trick a business owner or employee into giving up legitimate credentials. As a result, the hacker can access sensitive business information.

Other threats include IoT (internet of things) attacks owing to the increasing number of smart devices. There is also ransomware which increased by 340% from 2018 to 2019.

Using a password manager, and 2-factor authentication can help secure your business, but only professionals can provide foolproof cybersecurity.

Cloud Network Issues

Cloud computing has allowed better data storage, flexibility, and collaboration. It has allowed large enterprises to make better decisions while reducing costs, but you can expect to have issues with it in 2020.

One of the top cloud network issues will be security. There are risks involved in the implementation and management of the cloud, and reports on hacked interfaces, breaches, and account hijacking don’t help the situation.

Also while cloud computing enables businesses to scale without investing in expensive hardware, the quantities and cost become challenging to predict.

Implementation of Privacy Protection

Back in 2018, the EU general data protection regulations came into force. It was about time, but that came with challenges for businesses. Problems that will persist into 2020.

Governance and accountability top the list of concerns. The regulations created a need for business-wide regulations during the full lifecycle. Also, you have to provide more information to your data subjects (customers), and there is always the risk of getting that wrong.

Businesses also have to keep a detailed record of processing activities which is a burden. Mandatory impact assessment questions about when they are required is still a mystery.

Getting the Right Skills

Though freelancing has allowed businesses to hire from a wide-pool of experts, finding the right skills will still be a concern in 2020. And it should be your top concern as nothing can work without the right people.

Should you choose to hire an in-house expert, you can expect to pay a fortune in salaries, and their supply is quite limited. You also have to contend with compliance issues. As such, we recommend you outsource your IT needs.

Deep Fakes

Finally, you have to contend with deep fakes. People are employing unethical methods to make it seem like politicians and celebrities said things they did not say. Deep fakes will now trickle down, and business and thought leaders will find themselves at the mercy of such technology.

People willing to employ deep fakes will sway people’s opinions and can affect your business.

2020 will be a remarkable year for companies looking to use technology. But with great tech comes equally great challenges. The challenges above are a few you can expect.

Hire IT professionals, as they allow you to focus on the essential things in your business while they provide the necessary support.