As a small business owner, you already know the value of technology. And you may try to do it all on your own. But, there are some areas that you are better off outsourcing to an expert. On the flip side, there are many things you can do without assistance to keep from dipping into your profits. Here are a few DIY IT dos and don’ts.

Do choose your own phones and computers

When it comes to selecting the right devices for your business, options abound. Your phone is a terrific example. In most situations, it is between Apple and Android, so look at each operating system’s top-of-the-line models.

The iPhone XS Max, for instance, is a lot in a small package. It offers a generous screen size, the fastest chip available in a phone, takes stellar pictures, and has a long-lasting battery life. Most new Apple phones also come preloaded with facial recognition and other privacy features.

For Android, you can’t go wrong with the Samsung Galaxy Note 10, which is plenty fast and has a fairly large screen. What’s more, it includes lots of advanced security features, such as a designated file for sensitive information. It also functions through a platform designed to ward off cyber criminals – which Bentley University points out, these days cybercrime is of increasing importance, especially to small business owners.

Don’t try to handle data security unless you’re an expert

Data security is one of the most important aspects of your business. If you collect any personal information, you have to make this a priority. But, it is not as simple as just installing malware software to your computers, backing up your systems, and changing your passwords every so often.

Digital Guardian recently published more than 100 data protection tips; this clearly illustrates that protecting your data requires specialized knowledge and lots of it. Investing in a freelance consultant or company to help with your data security might not make you money directly, but it can help prevent a data disaster that could bankrupt your business.

Do fix common internet and equipment problems

Communications are cyberspace-centered these days, so you almost always need access to the web. But, before you panic and start shelling out money for a quick fix when your internet is down or a device fails, try troubleshooting things yourself.

Many common internet problems are solved by simply resetting your modem or wireless router. If things are suddenly slow, you might even check your internet provider’s terms of service to see if they lower speeds after X amount of usage. PC Mag also suggests changing the Wi-Fi channel if you are in a building with multiple wireless networks. Likewise, get familiar with how to fix paper jams on your office printer or copier. You may be pleasantly surprised to find that most issues can be fixed without expensive intervention.

Don’t design your website

A shoddy website is the equivalent of a brick-and-mortar building at the backside of an alley in the bad part of town. In other words, most people are going to steer clear of it. If your business is not web design, don’t try this at home. Look for someone to tackle it for you, such as a JavaScript developer with a solid grip on HTML, CSS, Grunt, Bower, and Gulp.

If you don’t know what any of those things are, that’s a sure sign that you need a pro. A great developer can create a compelling website that’s PC and mobile-friendly and will keep your users from clicking over to the competition. Remember, a top-notch, pleasing website is an investment that will bring a return, particularly if you have an e-commerce shop.

You don’t have to outsource everything, but you should put your money where it matters. Digital security and your online presence are not DIY tasks. Choosing your phone and office equipment, and tending them when needed, often are. Don’t be afraid to admit the things you can’t do, because the most successful business owners understand their specialties and are willing to pay for support where it’s required.

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